Skiing shoes – PW Minor http://pwminor.com/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 18:44:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://pwminor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-17-150x150.png Skiing shoes – PW Minor http://pwminor.com/ 32 32 Pennsylvania for Baby Boomers? Not so fast! https://pwminor.com/pennsylvania-for-baby-boomers-not-so-fast/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://pwminor.com/pennsylvania-for-baby-boomers-not-so-fast/ Historic Pool Forge Covered Bridge in Lancaster County Pennsylvania Editor’s note: In response to US News & World Report’s “Best Places to Retire in the US in 2022-2023” list which placed 5 Pennsylvania cities in the Top 10, I turned to one of our frequent contributors, a Pennsylvanian native, for his take. Take it Andy! […]]]>

Historic Pool Forge Covered Bridge in Lancaster County Pennsylvania

Editor’s note: In response to US News & World Report’s “Best Places to Retire in the US in 2022-2023” list which placed 5 Pennsylvania cities in the Top 10, I turned to one of our frequent contributors, a Pennsylvanian native, for his take. Take it Andy!


Is Pennsylvania the next big retirement destination? According to US News & World Report’s recently released list of the nation’s top retirement destinations, that might be the case.

The top two spots on this list are cities in Pennsylvania, both tranquil Pensacola and exciting Tampa. Next, Pennsylvania claims three more top ten spots, compared to only four Florida cities in that top ten.

Are you surprised by this? I was!

As a Pennsylvania native, I don’t dispute that these are all great places to call home. But when I carefully plan my early retirement, I can’t see how anything could be better than the fantastic retirement cities the Sunshine State has to offer!

So with that in mind, let me break down eight painfully obvious reasons why I can’t recommend a Keystone State retreat over one of Sunshine State’s many options.

I can’t handle the snow anymore

The main reason Pennsylvania can’t compete with Florida as a retirement destination is that time can never pile up.

I have spent my whole life dealing with an abundance of clouds and rain during the warm months. And that is only followed by WAY too much snow in the cold months.

I’m not going to spend my golden years doing the same thing.

Retirees moving to Florida don’t have to maintain snowblowers. They also don’t need to own a separate set of “snow tires” for their vehicles.

That alone is enough to convince me that Florida is my retirement destination.

Pennsylvania weather also means having an abundance of sweaters, boots, and jackets. Florida residents don’t have to worry about that nonsense and can usually wear shorts and sandals year-round.

Speaking of clothing requirements…

It’s also worth pointing out that the dress code is “resort casual” pretty much everywhere in Florida, so I can finally ditch those pleated Dockers and my collection of Geoffrey Beene dress shirts.

I’m a laid back guy, and the idea of ​​wearing shorts and boat shoes (or my new Hey Dudes) as “formal attire” is one of the most appealing aspects of a Florida retreat. You just can’t pull that off of most places in Pennsylvania.

Housing affordability is nonsense

The US News & World Report list cited housing affordability as a critical factor that makes Pennsylvania such an optimal retirement location.

This may be true when looking at the overall numbers, but I’ve noticed that most “affordable” homes in the north have WAY too many stairs.

And while many builders in Pennsylvania advertise low starting prices on new construction, buyers quickly learn that prices rise quickly once you add all the standard features found in almost all new homes in Florida.

Florida is the ultimate retirement destination, and all of these communities are designed to offer floor plans perfectly suited for retirement living. This means that you can easily find a home without steps and with minimal maintenance.

This is easier said than done in the North.

Retirement communities create ideal lifestyles

Not only do Florida retirement communities make it easier to find the perfect home for retirement living, but there’s also the added bonus of having plenty of fantastic activities and events geared toward the perfect retirement lifestyle.

Florida retirees are also more likely to be surrounded by neighbors at similar life stages, which means you’ll be able to make new friends in a neighborhood full of people looking for the same lifestyle you’re looking for.

Hershey Park is not Disney World and Lake Erie is not the Atlantic Ocean

They say everything in real estate comes down to location, location, location. And when it comes to location, it’s hard for any state to beat sunny Florida.

No matter where you choose to live in Florida, you’ll never be more than a short drive from beautiful beaches and world-class theme parks.

Meanwhile, the best Pennsylvania has to offer at this level is an odd combination of Lake Erie, Hershey Park, and driving to Atlantic City for a weekend getaway.

There is no comparison here.

Florida offers so many outdoor activities

Lifestyle options in Pennsylvania are attracting a lot of interest from outdoor enthusiasts, but just about anything you can do in the north can also be done in Florida. Plus, Florida gets bonus points because you can do these things year-round.

Pennsylvania residents love to fish in streams and rivers, but Florida residents can head out into the open waters to hunt monsters from the deep.

Florida also offers more options for kayaking enthusiasts, and there are walking trails and nature preserves near nearly every community we’ve featured here at Florida for Boomers.

Outside of downhill skiing, there’s not much Pennsylvania has to offer that can’t be replicated in Florida (year-round), so unless you’re obsessed with snowy mountains, head to south is the ticket.

You must pay state income tax in PA

Pennsylvania is widely recognized as an excellent tax state for retirees. This may be true for the country as a whole, but remember that there is no income tax in Florida at all.

Comparing a low tax rate to no tax may not seem like a big deal at first, because most people don’t expect to have a lot of income in retirement. But while every little bit is going to help you, you definitely need to get the most out of every dollar.

Healthcare ratings can be misleading

There’s no denying that Pennsylvania has outstanding healthcare facilities across the state, which is another reason given for many popular retirement destinations.

However, Florida is home to a similar number of world-class healthcare options, and residents will find that these healthcare facilities are even more senior-friendly than they are in the north.

Florida also has the advantage that many of its best healthcare facilities are located in various retirement destinations. In contrast, residents of Pennsylvania will likely need to travel to one of the major cities on either side of the state to get the best care.

Bring it all together

There’s no denying that Pennsylvania is a beautiful state with a lot to love. But Florida offers slightly better options in almost every category for those looking for the perfect retirement destination.

Once you’ve dealt with all of their reasons, it becomes relatively easy to see why so many Pennsylvania residents are considering packing their bags and heading south.

Life is better in Florida.

]]>
Another snowy spell in Kashmir starting today https://pwminor.com/another-snowy-spell-in-kashmir-starting-today/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 18:47:30 +0000 https://pwminor.com/another-snowy-spell-in-kashmir-starting-today/ KO archive photo: Abid Bhat Srinagar- The meteorological service on Tuesday predicted more rain and snowfall in the Kashmir Valley from Wednesday, likely to disrupt traffic along major highways, in addition to causing a sharp drop in daytime temperatures. “Partly cloudy weather is expected today and light to moderate rain/snowfall (on higher stretches) is expected […]]]>

KO archive photo: Abid Bhat

Srinagar- The meteorological service on Tuesday predicted more rain and snowfall in the Kashmir Valley from Wednesday, likely to disrupt traffic along major highways, in addition to causing a sharp drop in daytime temperatures.

“Partly cloudy weather is expected today and light to moderate rain/snowfall (on higher stretches) is expected in many locations from November 9 evening to 11 am,” an official said Tuesday. of the meteorological service.

However, he said, there was no major rain/snow forecast during the period.

From Nov. 12 to 16, he said, the weather should be “fair to partly cloudy.”

Regarding likely impacts, he said, snowfall and low temperatures could lead to temporary disruption of surface transportation, mainly on Zojila, Jammu-Srinagar highway, Leh-Manali highway November 10 and 11.

“Before embarking on the journey, people are advised to check the road conditions with the traffic police to avoid inconvenience,” the MeT official said, adding, “Travellers are advised high passes to carry enough food, warm shoes, clothes, etc. with them as road conditions remain uncertain in bad weather.

Meanwhile, Srinagar recorded a low of 4.3C from 4.2C the previous night, the official said. The temperature was 2.5°C above normal for the summer capital at this time of year.

Qazigund recorded a low of 5.0°C from 5.4°C the previous night, while in Pahalgam the mercury settled at minus 1.6°C from 1.6°C the previous night and it was 0.5°C lower than normal for the southern Kashmir resort. , he said.

Kokernag recorded a low of 4.1°C from 4.6°C the night before and it was 1.4°C above normal for the place, he said.

Gulmarg recorded a low of minus 2.6C from minus 4.5C the previous night and it was 2.8C below normal for the world famous ski resort in Baramulla District, Australia northern Kashmir.

In the town of Kupwara, the mercury settled at 28C from 2.3C the previous night, the official said. It was 1.5C above normal for northern Kashmir, he said.

Regarding rainfall in the past 24 hours till 08:30, the official said that Srinagar received 1.9mm of rain, Qazigund 24.6mm, Pahalgam 10.2mm, Kupwara 5.2mm, Kokernag 12, 6mm, Gulmarg 2.6mm, Jammu Void, Banihal 27.8mm, Batote 7.8mm, Katra 7.0mm and Bhaderwah 2.2mm.


Follow this link to join our WhatsApp group: Join now

Be part of quality journalism

Quality journalism takes a lot of time, money and hard work to produce and despite all the difficulties, we still do it. Our journalists and editors work overtime in Kashmir and beyond to cover what matters to you, tell great stories and expose injustices that can change lives. Today, more people are reading Kashmir Observer than ever before, but only a handful are paying as advertising revenue plummets.

ACT NOW


CLICK FOR DETAILS


]]>
5 Reasons to Try Nordic Walking – Cleveland Clinic https://pwminor.com/5-reasons-to-try-nordic-walking-cleveland-clinic/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://pwminor.com/5-reasons-to-try-nordic-walking-cleveland-clinic/ Want to take your daily walk to the next level? Then put a pair of walking sticks in your hands and enter the world of Nordic walking. Cleveland Clinic is a nonprofit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy The exercise […]]]>

Want to take your daily walk to the next level? Then put a pair of walking sticks in your hands and enter the world of Nordic walking.

Cleveland Clinic is a nonprofit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

The exercise can turn a basic hike into a full-body workout by mimicking the moves used by cross-country skiers. (Hence the poles.) In Nordic walking, each step includes a pole-planting motion that works your upper body muscles.

So what difference can anything that touches the ground make? Let’s find out with exercise specialist Ben Kuharik.

What is Nordic walking?

In the world of cross-country skiing, Finland is considered a powerhouse. Winter activity is part of the national culture. It makes sense considering the landscape looks like a tundra for so many months each year.

But it doesn’t ALWAYS snow there, which explains the origin of Nordic walking. Basically, it was off-season training for cross-country skiing.

In Nordic walking, you use the hand poles to propel you forward. (More on that below.) “It’s basically the same move that cross-country skiers use,” says Kuharik. “You just don’t need snow for this activity.”

Benefits of Nordic walking

Walking is a fabulous type of exercise. But when it comes to working your core, it doesn’t exactly target the muscles north of your waistline. Your legs do the heavy lifting to carry you around.

Nordic walking, on the other hand, increases the level of intensity by bringing your upper body into the activity. Here’s what it does:

1. Better overall workout

Nordic walking engages over 90% of your body’s muscles through the use of poles. “It’s really going to give you a full body workout using the muscles up and down your body,” says Kuharik.

In particular, expect to work these upper body areas:

  • Back muscles, especially your lats (latissimus dorsi) and traps (trapezius). It can also help improve your posture.
  • Chest muscles, like your pecs (pectoralis majors).
  • shoulder musclesincluding your deltoids.
  • arm musclesfocusing on your forearms and triceps.

An additional bonus? With more muscles in action, your heart will work a little harder to pump blood throughout your body. “It will definitely do a little more to help strengthen your core,” notes Kuharik.

In fact, a recent study shows that Nordic walking can improve heart function and quality of life in people with coronary heart disease.

2. calorie burn

Do you know what happens when you put more strain on your muscles? You burn a lot more calories.

Various studies estimate that Nordic walking burns between 18% and 67% more calories than traditional walking. “It’s quite a large amount,” says Kuharik. “You get the most out of your exercise time.”

3. Less stress on your legs

Each single-pole plant with a Nordic walking stride takes the strain off your legs a bit. The cumulative effect of this is less wear and tear on your ankles, knees and hips as you rack up the miles.

This also makes Nordic walking a great option for anyone with leg pain or injury.

“In terms of the care and longevity of your lower joints, Nordic walking is definitely preferred,” says Kuharik.

4. Better Balance

Nordic walking poles also provide added stability while you train. “It’s super important, especially when you start to age,” says Kuharik. “The risk of falling increases with age. Poles can help you keep your balance.

The strength you develop through Nordic walking will also help. Researchers working with people in a cardiac rehab group found that a three-week Nordic walking program resulted in increased coordination.

5. Go faster and further

The efficiency of the movement that comes from being propelled forward with Nordic walking poles leads to a faster pace, Kuharik says. According to some estimates, you can navigate up to 25% faster than regular walking.

“You should be able to cover more distance before you tire,” he adds. “Going further means seeing more…so be sure to enjoy the scenery.”

How to start Nordic walking

Your first step to start Nordic walking is to go shopping. You will need a pair of specialized sticks, which include wrist straps. (“You really can’t just use a walking stick out of the woods,” Kuharik says.)

The good news? It is possible to find adjustable poles in the $20 range at various retailers. High end poles are around $100.

Look for a stick with a pointed tip if you will be walking on trails or dirt surfaces. If you’re more of a sidewalk explorer, get a pole with a duller rubber end. (Some posts allow you to change the tip for either surface.)

Don’t forget to also invest in a good pair of shoes, as if you were starting a regular walking program.

Perfecting your Nordic walking form

Let’s start with the good news: Nordic walking basically uses your normal walking motion. There’s no funky body movement or wild arm swing that needs to be added.

Of course, there’s still a bit more to exercise than just carrying two poles.

Many scientific studies of Nordic walking use a 10-step technique developed by the International Nordic Walking Federation (INWA). The focus is on building a “natural, biomechanically correct” walking form.

How-to videos are available online, but here are some highlights on the form:

  • In Nordic walking, you don’t extend the poles forward (like what you would if you were sticking a hiking pole into the ground in front of you). Instead, the poles will stay at your side and angled back.
  • Your Nordic walking poles will touch the ground on the side of your leg halfway between your two feet as you walk. The idea is to use the soft sole of the pole to push or propel you forward. “It’s just a little propulsion,” says Kuharik.
  • In the most common form of Nordic walking, your arms and legs move alternately. This means that your right arm swings forward as you step forward with your left foot, and vice versa.
  • Take longer than normal strides and try to roll your feet from heel to toe with each step.
  • Focus on good posture with your chin up, shoulders back, and chest out.
  • There’s no need to put a deadly grip on the walking stick, so relax your hand when it’s not being pushed down. (The wrist strap will help you maintain control of the stick.)

Who should try Nordic walking?

The activity is ideal for just about everyone, although there are a few exceptions. Kuharik says Nordic walking is not recommended for someone recovering from an upper body injury given the stress it could put on the wrist, shoulder and elbow joints.

“But overall, it’s worth a try if you’re looking to add something extra to your walking routine,” he reassures. “You’re definitely going to get a more complete workout with it.”

]]>
10 Things You Should Know Before Visiting Japan (But Probably Never Expected) https://pwminor.com/10-things-you-should-know-before-visiting-japan-but-probably-never-expected/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://pwminor.com/10-things-you-should-know-before-visiting-japan-but-probably-never-expected/ Japan is a country that intrigues many travelers; it has a unique culture that is virtually untouched by outside influences. Not only is the food varied and delicious, but the popular places to visit offer the perfect combination of city life and quiet nature experiences. Travelers planning a visit to Japan are ready for the […]]]>

Japan is a country that intrigues many travelers; it has a unique culture that is virtually untouched by outside influences. Not only is the food varied and delicious, but the popular places to visit offer the perfect combination of city life and quiet nature experiences. Travelers planning a visit to Japan are ready for the trip of a lifetime, but there are a few things they should keep in mind to make the most of their time in this beautiful destination.


10/10 Buy your JR Pass before departure

A JR (Japan Rail) pass allows travelers unlimited rides on the JR Shinkansen (bullet train) lines stretching from Tokyo across the county. Passes can be purchased for periods of seven, fourteen, or twenty-one days depending on how long travelers plan to explore the country. However, the easiest way to get the JR pass to maximize your time on trains in Japan is to buy it online in your home country. Then, you will collect an exchange order from your local branch and present this document together with your passport at a JR station in Japan to obtain the pass upon arrival.

9/10 Eating while walking is not allowed

When traveling to any country, it is important to be aware of cultural differences so that you can respect them. In Japan, one of these subtleties is the etiquette around eating on the go. In North America, it’s common to snack on a granola bar or a banana while running out, at the mall, or walking down the street. In Japan, this is considered extremely rude due to the belief that performing an activity while eating means you dislike or dislike the food. Therefore, when buying food from a market stall or roadside store, be sure to sit on a bench or wait until you are still to start indulging yourself.

Related: From Hot Springs to Winter Festivals: How to Explore Japan’s Scenic Snowlands

8/10 You must have your passport with you

Many people choose to leave their passport in a hotel or hostel safe while exploring a new city. Although this is often the safest decision, in Japan it is the law for foreign tourists to have their passport with them at all times. This is required by the Japanese authorities, who have the right to stop you and ask for this ID. One of the advantages of the passport is that tourists who shop at specific stores in Japan and spend more than 5,000 yen are entitled to duty-free shopping if they present their passport at the checkout.

7/10 You must take off your shoes when entering a house

Americans may have a habit of wearing shoes inside their homes, and some Canadians have this habit as well. In Japan, this is considered very offensive. Whenever Travelers enter someone else’s home, they must remove their shoes at the door out of respect. In many cases, the host will provide guests with a pair of slippers to wear inside the house. In hotels or Airbnbs in Japan, travelers will often see signs asking them to remove their shoes in the entrance and use the slippers provided with the accommodation.

6/10 Talking on the phone on public transport is considered rude

Every North American who has been to a major city like New York, Toronto, or Chicago has felt the irritation of listening to someone else’s loud phone conversation on public transportation. In Japan, this is never a problem because the unspoken rule is that you should never answer your phone or chat on public transport. It is a space to be calm and respectful of those around you.

5/10 Tokyo subway system closes early (for a major city)

With its reputation as a bustling metropolis, Tokyo may seem like a city that never sleeps, but in reality, the nightlife there is dying off pretty early. This is largely due to the fact that the subway system closes early at night compared to Toronto or New York. The trains are not 24 hours; most subway lines end their service around midnight or 1 a.m., with some making their final departure from areas like Shibuya or Shinjuku even earlier. Be sure to plan nighttime activities accordingly, as after the metro closes, transportation options are limited.

Related: Why Kusatsu Onsen Is Considered The Best In Japan

4/10 Slurping is good manners

Although North American travelers probably grew up with the idea that it’s rude to drink or eat soup, they may leave that idea behind when they board a plane to Tokyo. In Japan, not sipping is actually what is considered rude. As part of the culture, sipping while eating indicates that you enjoy food.

3/10 How you pass and accept cash

Many stores in Japan now accept credit cards, but it’s always a good idea to carry cash in the local currency, especially for smaller establishments. However, how travelers accept currency and remit payment in Japan is important. When paying, travelers will notice a small tray near the checkout, often a blue plastic tray. This is where they should put the money rather than handing it directly to the cashier. When the cashier gives the change, give him time to put it on the tray before picking it up. This is more respectful and provides some distance when interacting.

2/10 Tattoos need to be covered

Tattoos were once extremely taboo in Japan, those who wore them could not enjoy the luxury of public onsen (hot baths). Although the culture is somewhat more accepting of tattoos, they are still generally frowned upon due to their association with the group called Yakuza. Therefore, tattooed travelers should be aware that they may be rejected from some onsen facilities where they have to bathe naked, thus exposing the tattoo. Look for tattoo-friendly onsen like Natural Hot Spring Hisamatsuyu in Tokyo.

1/10 Tipping is not part of the culture

North Americans may be used to tipping as a sign of appreciation that the service was exceptional. However, in Japan, tipping is not part of the culture and leaving extra money when paying a bill can be confusing. Staff will chase travelers down the street in an attempt to return any extra coins they ‘forgot’ at the table, a sign of the honesty and thoughtfulness of people in this wonderful destination.

]]>
Red Bull clubs like Leipzig face uncertain future after Dietrich Mateschitz’s death https://pwminor.com/red-bull-clubs-like-leipzig-face-uncertain-future-after-dietrich-mateschitzs-death/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 04:51:11 +0000 https://pwminor.com/red-bull-clubs-like-leipzig-face-uncertain-future-after-dietrich-mateschitzs-death/ On the pitch, it was the perfect week for RB Leipzig. A 3-2 win over Champions League holders Real Madrid on Tuesday puts them one point clear of qualification for the knockout stages. Four days later, Marco Rose’s men beat Bayer Leverkusen 2-0 to extend their unbeaten run to nine games and move within touching […]]]>

On the pitch, it was the perfect week for RB Leipzig. A 3-2 win over Champions League holders Real Madrid on Tuesday puts them one point clear of qualification for the knockout stages.

Four days later, Marco Rose’s men beat Bayer Leverkusen 2-0 to extend their unbeaten run to nine games and move within touching distance of fourth place. And on top of all that, to misquote the famous English fan chant, even Timo Werner scored. Twice. “He’s quick, he’s dangerous and he’s a big personality which is important for the dressing room,” Rose said of the 26-year-old who improved a lot after his second goal in as many games.

Werner’s return to Saxony had not paid significant dividends in the first two months of the season. Now, however, there are signs he is regaining some of the confidence and efficiency that seemed to have been lost somewhere in the Channel when he moved to Chelsea in 2020. The re-emergence of the German striker of his funk is one of the reasons why Leipzig haven’t felt so good about themselves and the team’s chances since winning the DFB-Pokal, their first trophy, in May this year.

But just as things are starting to gel again for the team, the death of Red Bull founder Dietrich Mateschitz on October 22 has raised troubling questions about the club’s future. In his native Austria and Germany, dozens and dozens of newspaper articles attempted to determine what the 78-year-old’s death meant for the soft drinks giant (annual sales: 8 billion euros ) and the list of sports teams it owns. The answer was always the same: no one really knows.

In the halls of RB Leipzig club HQ just across the Elster Canal from the Red Bull Arena, there is a sense of business as usual. Things will continue as they were, with Red Bull sponsoring the shirt and stadium naming rights at a cost of €40m (£34.4m) a year, employees have been told. In the past, Mateschitz’s company had provided loans worth nearly €200m, mostly to help Leipzig buy players.

A debt-for-equity swap – criticized as an unfair financial trickery by clubs such as Eintracht Frankfurt who have no artificial sweetener to finance them – saw Red Bull write off 100 million euros in 2019.


A minute’s silence before RB Leipzig’s game against Real Madrid (Photo: Maja Hitij/Getty Images)

Further repayments reduced the club’s debt to the drinks company to €56m. Champions League qualification for five of their six years at the top level and their lucrative model of selling players have put them on a fairly solid financial footing, with revenue of €370m in 2020-21 , more than Borussia Dortmund (340 million euros).

Nonetheless, the club is so absorbed in the Red Bull brand image – let alone the synergies of the RB football group, with its vertically integrated breeding of talented players such as Benjamin Sesko – that it’s impossible to see how they could even be remote. also successful if the money from Red Bull’s main office in Fuschl, a small town near Salzburg, were to dry up.

Everything will depend on who will be the next responsible. In recent years, Mateschitz’s son Mark, 29, had been groomed to succeed him, but he will need the assent of the Yoovidhya family, which owns 51% of the business. Mateschitz, who had founded the company with Thai entrepreneur Chaleo Yoovidhya after stumbling across his energy drink in Hong Kong in the mid-1980s, was allowed to run the company more or less as he pleased, but didn’t never held more than a minority share of 49%. . There is a chance that the Yoovidyha family will push for more say. Will they share Dietrich Mateschitz’s enthusiasm for Formula 1, football, skiing and various extreme sports? Or could they decide that now was the best time to cash in and sell to a rival, instead of betting that Mark Mateschitz will fill his father’s shoes?

But even if Mark Mateschitz ascends the aluminum throne, there’s no guarantee the company’s attention won’t shift away from sports sponsorship. He never talked about his plans and preferences.

Red Bull spends approximately €1.6 billion on marketing each year, of which €800 million goes directly to supporting teams and individual athletes. Senior officials in Leipzig and elsewhere are reassured that the soft drink has become largely synonymous with sport. Why change one of the most successful marketing strategies since Coca-Cola co-opted Santa nearly 100 years ago?

It will be some time before we know for sure the future direction of the company. Those working under the Red Bull banner can only hope there won’t be big changes, but in some ways that’s impossible, as new lines of command will inevitably emerge. Until he began to suffer from pancreatic cancer 18 months ago, Austria’s richest man (a net worth of 26 billion euros) was known to be practical and ambitious. Whoever succeeds Dietrich Mateschitz may be more interventionist or, on the contrary, much less motivated. In a place like Leipzig, that difference could translate into pushing much harder to challenge Bayern Munich for top spot on one side and simply pushing things forward on the other, like Volkswagen does at his club Wolfsburg.

Mateschitz’s death will also affect the deep animosity towards RB Leipzig within German football. Many traditional club ultras and supporters didn’t just love the artifice of the club and the brazen circumvention of the 50+1 rule that stipulates member control. (Leipzig actively limits membership to a select group of employees). They also didn’t like the man behind the can very much.

A branding genius, Mateschitz reportedly realized his personal views — staunchly nativist, populist, reactionary — were anathema to a fledgling global lifestyle and sports company. Therefore, he rarely spoke in public. But his media ventures have featured people with questionable policies as well as amateur epidemiologists who graduated from 4Chan University, and he once personally threatened to have an investigative journalist run over.

When the employees of his television station Servus wanted to form a union, he told them that he preferred to close the station. For those who hate investor-run clubs in principle, it will probably be a little harder to hate a faceless company than a septuagenarian right-wing billionaire from the Austrian province.

Assuming Red Bull does indeed continue its commitment, Mateschitz’s passing should at least help detoxify the RB brand within German football.

But the extent of a possible softening of the attitude towards them will remain as uncertain as their medium-term sporting prospects. While the past seven days have underscored how far Leipzig have come since Mateschitz established the club in 2009, it’s suddenly much less clear what the next 13 years might look like.

(Top photo: Jerry Andre ATPImages/Getty Images)

]]>
Last curling rock thrown in honor of Ian Scott | Spare News https://pwminor.com/last-curling-rock-thrown-in-honor-of-ian-scott-spare-news/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 15:37:38 +0000 https://pwminor.com/last-curling-rock-thrown-in-honor-of-ian-scott-spare-news/ Renfrew – More than 100 family, friends and business associates of the late Ian Scott gathered at the Renfrew Curling Club on Saturday to throw curling rocks or shout “hurry up” one last time during a celebration of life honoring the man who carried on the century-old legacy of one of downtown Renfrew’s oldest businesses. […]]]>

Renfrew – More than 100 family, friends and business associates of the late Ian Scott gathered at the Renfrew Curling Club on Saturday to throw curling rocks or shout “hurry up” one last time during a celebration of life honoring the man who carried on the century-old legacy of one of downtown Renfrew’s oldest businesses.

It can be hard to find longtime residents who not only bought a pair of shoes or boots at Scott’s shoe store, but also shared a laugh outside with the man who was rarely seen without a smile. , but who has carried the multi-generational family store through good times and bad.

Hosted by the Scott family, it was a gathering where tears were almost impossible to find, but instead the afternoon tribute was filled with laughter, amusing stories about the man of successful business and a toast or two in his honor.

The jubilant atmosphere was exactly what Dr. Lauren Scott, her daughter who, along with her brother, Nathan Scott, hoped to transpire.

“It’s exactly what my dad would have wanted,” she said as she made her way to the ice surface to play a game in his honor. “My dad loved to have fun and that’s perfect. Although he had fun in many sports, he was a very serious competitor who always worked hard to perfect his game. Whether it was curling, skiing or golf, he tried to win the game until until it is finished. Then it was about enjoying his time with the person he was playing with that day.

“That’s why we put on our curling shoes or tap shoes and went on the ice. I thought it might be hard to get going, but once on the ice, there was nothing but laughter and fun for all. But I have to admit, I’m like my dad when it comes to being competitive, but that was furthest from my mind when everyone started curling.

Dr Scott said when it came to choosing a place to pay tribute to his father, a few places came to mind, but in the end they realized the curling club was the best fit.

“Since his high school days, my dad was either in the store or involved with the curling club in some way,” she said. “Whether he was playing a game with old friends or volunteering at the club, curling was an important part of his life. And today we will honor him by curling to remember him.”

When several guests entered the club, they took the stairs to the second floor and many stopped to look at a framed picture on the wall. They saw four young students from Renfrew Collegiate Institute (RCI) pose with the Ontario Schoolboy Curling Champions trophy which they brought back to Renfrew.

It was 1969 and alongside George Cox, Andy Fraser and Dick Lamourie, smiling but serious 16-year-old Ian Scott was part of a team that not only brought home the material, but was amazed at the reception awaiting them.

As Norm Bujold, a longtime friend and fellow RCI champion when he won several provincial and national wrestling championships, recalled, the four young curlers were local heroes.

“They took this trophy home in a giant parade through downtown and it was something that was a once in a lifetime event,” he said. “The streets were lined up for the four guys from Renfrew who were the best in all of Ontario. Not too bad for small town guys.

Mr. Bujold recalled when he and Mr. Scott attended Algonquin College in Ottawa after their time at RCI.

“We were young boys going to Ottawa to graduate and just like curling, Ian took it very seriously,” he said. “But we also had fun from time to time and enjoyed our time. But Ian knew he was there to learn the business and he came back to Renfrew to help run the family shoe store and it was hard not to go downtown on any given day and see him there. ‘outside. I had my business across the street for many years and it was always busy.

Four generations of Scotts

Mr. Scott was only six years old when his father (Stewart) died untimely in 1960. His mother (Frances Scott Lockwood) took over running the family store until her retirement in 1978. Mr. Scott worked at the family store as a teenager before leaving for high school and coming back from college and finally taking over the store in 1978 until his retirement a few years ago.

It was truly a family business as Mr. Scott and his current wife, Jane Galbraith, not only mentored their own children in the family business, but countless teenagers learned the importance of customer service over the years. year.

Their son, Nathan, worked out of Renfrew for a few years but returned home to take over operations when his parents retired. Like her brother, Dr. Scott learned a thing or two about the business when she started working there at age 12.

“You could say shoes are part of being a Scott,” she joked. “I worked there all through high school and when I came home in the summer from Queen’s University. After graduating as a Doctor of Chiropractic, I went back and worked there until Lucas (her husband, Dr. Lucas Regier and co-owner of Renfrew Chiropractic and Rehabilitation Centre) and I completed all the necessary paperwork to open our business.

She said no one expects her brother Nathan to fill his father’s shoes, but he will continue to serve the people of Renfrew and surrounding areas with the same professionalism their parents instilled in them and will treat their customers not only like customers, but like friends and neighbours.

“He will be the fourth generation of Scotts in downtown Renfrew and when you think about it, that in itself is pretty incredible,” she said. “Just like my father and his father before him, Nathan and the staff will carry on the true small town tradition that has sustained the business for over 100 years (est. 1895).”

There was one thing all the guests who packed the curling club on Saturday would agree on. Ian Scott was also having a great time as he watched from above with his trademark smile.

]]>
Osprey Zealot and ‘Nimsdai’ Climbing Packs: Purpose Drives Design https://pwminor.com/osprey-zealot-and-nimsdai-climbing-packs-purpose-drives-design/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 22:46:01 +0000 https://pwminor.com/osprey-zealot-and-nimsdai-climbing-packs-purpose-drives-design/ Home » Climbing » Osprey Zealot and ‘Nimsdai’ Climbing Packs: Purpose Drives Design Osprey has built its new line of packs to appeal to a wide range of climbers. The Zealot series covers cliff dogs and gym rats, and the Mutant line belongs to mountaineers and ice climbers. We’ve all heard of “gym to rock” […]]]>

Osprey has built its new line of packs to appeal to a wide range of climbers. The Zealot series covers cliff dogs and gym rats, and the Mutant line belongs to mountaineers and ice climbers.

We’ve all heard of “gym to rock” climbing – well, what about mountaineering from the gym to high altitude? Osprey seeks to cater to this range of demographics and climbing disciplines with its new line of packs and chalk bags.

The company is positioning the Zealot 45 and 30 bags, along with the chalk bucket and chalk bag, to help you stay organized and motivated at the gym or on the crag. And the Mutant 90, 52, 38 and 22 can help you bring the essentials of a laid-back day to Ouray Ice Park in the Himalayas.

The ubiquitous pack builder has called on some serious talent to design the Mutant line – Nims Purja. Osprey said he created the Mutant 90 specifically for Purja, who works for the brand as an ambassador. Meanwhile, the Zealot 30 is its first gym climbing pack.

Here’s a quick look at the new gear.

(Photo/osprey)

Zealot 30, 45 and chalk bags

Each Zealot pack has a molded EVA back panel with a high density plastic frame sheet to help heavy and bulky gear ride comfortably and safely.

Osprey builds the 45L rig for cliff days. It comes with a rope tarp with tie loops to help you remember the upward direction. With dual access to the main compartment, you can access your gear no matter how bad the spaghetti mess is inside your pack.

osprey zealot 45 climbing pack
The Zealot 45; (photo/osprey)

The 30L duffel bag has segmented interior organization to keep your most nasty items (smelly shoes, chalk bag) separate from your more delicate items (phone, laptop, headphones).

osprey climbing bag
The Zealot 30 (left) and 45; (photo/osprey)

Speaking of chalk, the Zealot bucket closes magnetically – which is a masterstroke, in my opinion. Chalk buckets that close with hook-and-loop straps always get dirty from repeated fumbling with dirty fingers, in my experience, and the velcro can even clog with coagulated chalk. Either that or you leave it open on the floor and it tips over.

If performed correctly, the magnetic closure relieves both pain points. Crack, give it a swipe to close it, and drop it where you’re standing.

The Zealot chalk bag looks simple, with a conventional strap closure. Each chalk receptacle comes with exterior pockets to help you keep the essentials with you.

zealot collection 45
(Photo/osprey)

Mutant Nimsdai 90, 52, 38 and 22

The Mutant series, including the flagship Nimsdai 90, belongs to the mountains.

A lightweight wire frame (90L) or frame sheet with aluminum stays (52L, 38L, 22L) helps stabilize loads. Osprey also uses what it calls “snow guard” fabric on the EVA backpanel to make wet days less of a hassle. (It’s still unclear if that works or not.) And the shoulder straps are covered with an outer layer of mesh to improve breathability.

Osprey nimsdai 90
(Photo/osprey)

For outdoor organization, each features two “tool locks” with bungee ties for your axes, daisy chain loops compatible with sail straps, and included removable straps with side-release buckles.

The hip belts have gear loops and ice ax holsters, and you can drag your rope up with another adjustable strap.

All packs also receive a hydration pouch. Each model, except the 22L, has a removable brain and a jacket/stash pocket. The 52 and 38L variants have straps for carrying A-frame style skis, as well as an expandable helmet net that you can attach in multiple places. If you ski with the 22L, you can take your poles in an A configuration with sail straps.

Osprey gave the pack a narrow profile and designed it for close-fitting carry to reduce snags and help the wearer move naturally. The backpacks have a durable water repellent (DWR) treatment without PFC or PFAS.

Sean McCoy wearing the Osprey UNLTD bag while hiking in Colorado
Osprey UNLTD is the luxury SUV of backpacks
At $700, the Osprey UNLTD packs a bunch of features and technology. But who should buy it, and why? Keep reading to find out. Read more…
]]>
New leaders on campus: the SBU trio share their hopes and perspectives https://pwminor.com/new-leaders-on-campus-the-sbu-trio-share-their-hopes-and-perspectives/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 12:00:31 +0000 https://pwminor.com/new-leaders-on-campus-the-sbu-trio-share-their-hopes-and-perspectives/ Stony Brook University has welcomed a trio of new leaders to its campus over the past few months. Provost Carl Lejuez, Vice President of Marketing and Communications William Warren and Senior Vice President of Finance and Administration Jed Shivers recently shared their goals for Stony Brook and their excitement about joining a university. flagship of […]]]>

Stony Brook University has welcomed a trio of new leaders to its campus over the past few months. Provost Carl Lejuez, Vice President of Marketing and Communications William Warren and Senior Vice President of Finance and Administration Jed Shivers recently shared their goals for Stony Brook and their excitement about joining a university. flagship of the State University of New York educational system.

Carl Lejuez. Photo by Stony Brook University

Provost Lejuez

As Provost, Carl Lejuez is responsible for Stony Brook University faculty, staff, and students.

Lejuez, who has asked people to call him by his first name instead of trying to pronounce his last name — which, by the way, is Lejh way — is making a concerted effort to forge bonds on campus.

“Every time I show up, I don’t say ‘Provost,'” he said. “I say, ‘Professor in the Department of Psychology.’ I don’t believe I can be a credible faculty leader if there isn’t a sense of sitting in their shoes and understanding the implications of the strategic and practical decisions we make.

Lejuez, who grew up in Secaucus, New Jersey, earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology from Emory University and her master of arts and doctorate degrees in clinical psychology from West Virginia University.

As a first-generation student, Lejuez feels inspired by the opportunity for students to experience a place of world-class research in an environment that cares about student success.

For first-generation students, in particular, he recognizes the need to bond with professors.

These close connections help to “take what is happening in the classroom, which can be esoteric knowledge, and turn it into passion and understanding”, giving students the opportunity to see how what they are learning in a manual applies to the world.

He wants to expand the scope and reach of these hands-on experiences for students, while acknowledging “everything that’s been put into it by faculty and staff,” he said.

Lejuez believes that faculty’s ability to conduct extraordinary and groundbreaking research should dovetail with their commitment to be accomplished educators.

“We set expectations from the start,” he said. “When you start here, when you’re progressing and doing well, you’re great at both research and teaching.”

Stony Brook has a Center of Excellence in Learning and Teaching which provides support to faculty who may need polishing or improvement to inspire and educate students.

Stony Brook takes a close look at student ratings, while also looking at other data when evaluating its teachers.

Lejuez, who most recently served as provost and executive vice president of academic affairs at the University of Connecticut, supports strong and growing areas for the university, including clinical psychology, quantum information systems, and science. climate science, among others.

“These are areas that Stony Brook has a real opportunity to develop and part of my role has been to think about how to identify incredibly strong areas and areas that can emerge in this way and merge them with growing fields,” he said.

Lejuez believes in academic excellence and in diversity and equity.

He hopes to expand the range of countries and regions from which the university recruits students and faculty.

Lejuez describes Stony Brook as “one of public universities’ best-kept secrets,” ranking first in the state in public schools, according to the 2022-2023 U.S. News and World Report rankings.

“Our goal now is to remove the best-kept secret part,” Lejuez said.

William Warren. Stony Brook University Marketing Photo

Raising the profile of SB

That’s where William Warren, vice president of marketing and communications, comes in.

Warren has held numerous corporate and academic positions, including as Director of Marketing and Communications at the University of Utah.

Warren hopes to raise “Stony Brook’s profile and really claim the kind of credit and attention this institution deserves,” he said.

Previously at Coca Cola, among others, Warren welcomes the opportunity to support Stony Brook.

“You want an exciting and achievable challenge,” he says. “It means having a fabulous thing to market that may be undervalued.”

Warren divides marketing into earned and paid media. For the former, he hopes to do the hard work of building relationships with national reporters, who can publicize the accomplishments and experts available at Stony Brook.

Warner plans to continue working with regional and local journalists, while engaging in an ongoing effort to share Stony Brook’s story, including raising awareness of initiatives such as the Simons Stem Scholars program which supports students from minorities entering scientific fields.

As for the paying coin, Warren sees opportunities in multiple dimensions.

“The great thing about the paid marketing campaign is that it’s adaptable to all sorts of goals,” he said. “Student recruitment can use the campaign to recruit the right students. We can use the campaign to help us recruit great teachers. It can also be adapted to “attract more donor support”.

However, any marketing effort must remain grounded in truth.

“You want to come out with a message that resonates that teachers will see and say, ‘This is what we’re offering,'” Warren said. “We are not blowing smoke.”

A marketing campaign includes a host of elements, such as best execution and photography that supports the message.

An evolved campaign could include a new slogan for the school.

The “Coke is it” campaign reinforces the idea of ​​authenticity because consumers can be sure it’s “exactly what you think it is,” Warren said. “He never disappoints. It’s still consistent and part of American culture.

In developing a slogan for Stony Brook, which Warren says is less important than the underlying message, he wants to focus on the handful of characteristics that capture the university’s personality.

Reflecting on the differences between commercial and academic marketing, Warren noticed that academics tend to be more skeptical.

“You have to work to make them allies,” he said.

Outside of his marketing role, Warren, who originally pursued a doctorate in history at Rice University, shared an interest in teaching. At the University of Utah, he taught a course in American economic history, and at some point would also consider teaching at Stony Brook.

Since arriving on Long Island, Warren has enjoyed kayaking. He is also a former violinist and enjoys the opportunity to relax with music.

A return to the Northeast

After more than four years as vice president of finance and operations/chief operating officer at the University of North Dakota, Jed Shivers returns to the Northeast, which resembles the cultural and environmental vibe of his childhood home in Storrs, Connecticut.

Shivers, who is senior vice president of finance and administration at Stony Brook, enjoys riding the quad and the wooded areas around campus.

After living on the plains, which has “its own beauty,” Shivers appreciates the SB campus, which has “more trees,” and includes a view of fall foliage outside his office window in the administration building. .

Ready to embrace the opportunities and challenges of his work, Shivers said the university community is preparing a strategic plan for the next five years or so, which he will follow with a campus master plan.

In preparing this plan, he is working with a company that will survey all research space on campus and determine its current functional use, occupants, and intensity of use.

It also focuses on facilities that help in the delivery of education and hopes to conduct a similar survey of educational spaces.

In order to provide managers and executives with actionable financial information, the university has also embarked on a process of improving its business systems for human resources, budgeting, accounting and financial management.

With a “high rate of system outages around campus” creating a “significant problem” for the university, Stony Brook’s building and infrastructure are all aging at the same time, Shivers said.

Campus planning, design and construction and campus operations and maintenance are constantly working to address these issues and resolve issues as quickly as possible, Shivers added.

The immediate need for deferred maintenance issues is over $1.5 billion, which dwarfs any comparably sized campus in the SUNY system.

The SUNY Building Fund and SUNY management provided funds to alleviate a small but substantial portion of these critical issues, he said. The university is also engaged in conversations with the Building Fund and the Budget Division about ways to use the funds for optimal results.

Chills were thrilled to have the chance ‘to walk into a place where the President [Maurie Mcinnis] was forming his team,” he said. He saw this opportunity as a chance to be part of the leadership “on a kind of ground floor”.

He takes on the challenge of working with the SUNY system.

In accordance with McInnis’ mandates since his arrival, Shivers would like to create a consolidated financial statement for Stony Brook and all of its affiliated entities.

Along with enjoying his rides through the quad, Shivers relished the opportunity to join other sports and school enthusiasts in supporting varsity teams and cultural life on campus. He and his wife Sandee have been married for almost 30 years.

Outside of work, Shivers said he was doing “everything wrong”, but was enthusiastic about it. This includes golf, tennis, skiing and biking. To get you in shape for the 100 mile North Fork ride, what he never did, he started indoor cycling almost five days a week.

]]>
A season of consolidation for French Nordic domains https://pwminor.com/a-season-of-consolidation-for-french-nordic-domains/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 07:57:47 +0000 https://pwminor.com/a-season-of-consolidation-for-french-nordic-domains/ The French Nordic domains were impatiently awaiting the 2021/22 season. Would visitors who have discovered the pleasures of cross-country skiing and snowshoeing return this season given the ongoing health crisis due to Covid and the reopening of alpine ski areas? The health crisis has led to a decrease in the number of school groups. At […]]]>

The French Nordic domains were impatiently awaiting the 2021/22 season. Would visitors who have discovered the pleasures of cross-country skiing and snowshoeing return this season given the ongoing health crisis due to Covid and the reopening of alpine ski areas?

The health crisis has led to a decrease in the number of school groups. At the same time, some schools in the Alps have canceled alpine activities to refocus on cross-country skiing, considered safer due to the spacing of groups. The ski areas also had to deal with a more complex organization and staff illness. However, persistent government restrictions have largely spared the sector.

The overall turnover is 15.2 M€. Up 55% compared to the average of the last 5 years but down from last season’s record of €19.7m when the lifts closed.

There were big problems recruiting staff. Both for the operation of ski areas and for associated services such as ski hire and hotels/restaurants. There were difficulties in accommodating groups in January 2022. There were also supply shortages for ski hire etc. and energy costs were already added to the list of problems.

In the French Northern Alps, the ski areas were able to open from the end of November and the cold and the lack of foehn meant that the resorts were open at the beginning of April. A heat wave in the spring caused a rapid thaw with no effect beyond the scheduled closing dates. Visitor numbers in Savoie increased by 20% on average, with some sites recording increases of 70%. The Isere is having a very good season. Season pass presales were exceptional due to good pre-season offers. Corrençon and Lans en Vercors even broke last season’s records. The Drome had 100 ski days with numbers just behind last year’s record.

The Jura is the second largest ski area in France in terms of turnover, around half of the Northern Alps. He had his second best season in 15 years. 760,000 skier days, just 5% less than last year’s record. The season saw both good snow and sunshine. Winter visitors have discovered and rediscovered the joys of Nordic activities. Interestingly, the three main sites saw a drop in visitor numbers, but the medium and small areas increased. Operators say this is due to increased season pass sales which are the mainstay of visitors from smaller areas. local area.

The Massif Central saw two main snowfalls during the season (including one in late autumn after the resorts closed) but the cold January weather preserved the snow. Then, fluctuating temperatures forced resorts and visitors to be reactive. There were more people on snowshoes and on foot with the resulting conflicts with cross-country skiers. Thing seen almost everywhere in France.

In the Pyrenees there were excellent snow conditions from November in Ariege and these continued until the beginning of February. Winter holidays were wet and a hot March, especially in the valleys where visitors melted with snow. The number of cross-country skiers has decreased, but this has been compensated by other activities. Catalan Pyrenees had an unusually long season with limited snowfall. Cold and sunny. Font Romeu opened for almost 4 months with excellent results.

The Southern Alps experienced a bit of snowy drought but most of the sites were able to open thanks to the work of the stations. Visitor numbers were still up from pre-covid. Hopefully the conditions didn’t put them off.

The Vosges have had a very good season, maintaining the good figures from last year. The season started at the end of November but the New Year was marred by rain with stations closed from December 27 to January 7. Turnover was 50% higher than the average over 85 to 92 business days. La Bresse Lispach has 55,000 skier days.

]]>
‘LPBW:’ Jeremy Roloff provides update on cabin’s ‘exciting progress’ https://pwminor.com/lpbw-jeremy-roloff-provides-update-on-cabins-exciting-progress/ Sat, 15 Oct 2022 19:20:45 +0000 https://pwminor.com/lpbw-jeremy-roloff-provides-update-on-cabins-exciting-progress/ LPBW Jeremy Roloff is making great progress on his latest project. He and his wife, Audrey Roloff, are renovating their cabin. They brought fans on this journey via social media, and he’s back with another update. Keep reading for all the details. In January, Jeremy gave fans a tour of the cabin via Instagram. In […]]]>

LPBW Jeremy Roloff is making great progress on his latest project. He and his wife, Audrey Roloff, are renovating their cabin. They brought fans on this journey via social media, and he’s back with another update. Keep reading for all the details.

In January, Jeremy gave fans a tour of the cabin via Instagram. In his post, he also revealed what they plan to do with the cabin. He explained, “Our goal is to create a space where couples come to celebrate great moments, families can hang out together, we can host mini-retreats and just create memories.”

Since then, they’ve shared some behind-the-scenes glimpses of the various renovations they’re doing. Looks like they’re quite busy.

At present, LPBW elders Audrey and Jeremy are still focused on projects that need to be completed there. But they check things on their to-do list and prepare everything for visitors in the future.

LPBW: Jeremy Roloff provides an update on the cabin’s “exciting progress”

On his Instagram stories on Friday, Jeremy showed LPBW fans the latest addition to the cabin. They installed a recessed in the entrance. It has four upper racks, a bench and four lower racks. So there is plenty of storage for shoes.

Jeremy hasn’t mentioned it at this point, but it’s possible they’ll add some extra hooks or shelves at the entrance. In his January video, he mentioned wanting a spot in the cabin for visitors to get ready to ski, so this might be a good spot for that.

You can check out the photo below.

LPBW Jeremy Roloff Instagram

Not only are Jeremy and Audrey working on their cabin, but the house they recently bought for themselves is in need of repair. So they have many projects going on at the same time right now. Although the couple have a long to-do list, they seem to enjoy getting their hands dirty and making good progress.

Hopefully they will have another update for LPBW fans very soon. Fans love to see what they do and are surprised at how well they can tackle three young children, Ember, 5, Bode, 2, and Radley, almost 1.

So, do you like the latest addition to the Sun River Cabin? What do you think of all of Jeremy Roloff’s updates so far? Speak out in the comments section below and come back to TV shows for more LPBW family news.

Aubrey Chorpenning
Latest posts by Aubrey Chorpenning (see everything)

]]>