Skiing shoes – PW Minor http://pwminor.com/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 22:35:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://pwminor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-17-150x150.png Skiing shoes – PW Minor http://pwminor.com/ 32 32 Here’s how climate change and Covid are transforming skiing https://pwminor.com/heres-how-climate-change-and-covid-are-transforming-skiing/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 21:12:54 +0000 https://pwminor.com/heres-how-climate-change-and-covid-are-transforming-skiing/ STEVENS PASS, Wash. – Skiing is an endangered sport, caught between a warming planet and a global pandemic. But there is a boom in one corner of the skiing world that is driven, at least in part, by a combination of climate change and Covid. The unexpected recovery shows how skiers are adjusting to the […]]]>

STEVENS PASS, Wash. – Skiing is an endangered sport, caught between a warming planet and a global pandemic. But there is a boom in one corner of the skiing world that is driven, at least in part, by a combination of climate change and Covid.

The unexpected recovery shows how skiers are adjusting to the double crisis and how a winter sport is changing as snow cover decreases around the world.

Ski touring or downhill skiing, a hybrid style that combines elements of cross-country and downhill skiing, has been popular in Europe for decades. In the United States, however, it is traditionally a sport for mountain climbers and extreme athletes, who use special skis to climb slopes and in the backcountry in search of unspoiled powder.

That changed when the pandemic shut down ski resorts in 2020. Sales of hiking equipment in the United States rose as recreational skiers searched for ways to ascend without ski lifts. More than a million people in the United States used hiking equipment last year, even as most ski lifts reopened, sales of specialized equipment increasing 260% between November 2019 and the same month a year later, according to market research firm NPD Group.

“It’s not linear growth,” said Drew Hardesty, skier and forecaster at the Utah Avalanche Center. “It’s exponential.”

Touring skiers use removable traction bands called skins on their skis and adjustable bindings with free heels that allow them to walk. To descend, they remove the skins and block the heels for the descents.

The sport originated in Europe as a convenient form of transportation in winter, with the predecessors of today’s ski touring appearing as early as the 16th century. Alpine skiing is “part of the fabric of culture” in Europe, according to Drew Saunders, a senior executive at Oberalp Group, the mountain sports company that owns the Dynafit and Pomoca ski brands. “The European market is almost a generation ahead of us in terms of maturity and sophistication and ski touring in general,” Saunders said.

Ski touring began to seep into the American mainstream in the mid-2000s, when videos of wild backcountry descents in places like the Himalayas, high Andes, and the Arctic began. to circulate on the Internet. “Back then, there was hardly anyone doing it,” said Ingrid Backstrom, a professional skier who helped popularize ski touring in the United States through films of her descents on isolated trails. . “The equipment was harder to find, more expensive and didn’t perform as well.

In recent years, with decreasing snow cover and pristine powder increasingly difficult to reach, skiers like Ms. Backstrom have been pushed more often on groomed trails. This increased visibility, combined with pandemic closures, she said, has prompted more skiers to try hiking gear. “It always helps to have a visible example,” she said.

Ms Backstrom also said more and more skiers are choosing to avoid the backcountry and ski uphill on developed trails because it is “safer given extreme weather and climate change.”

One of the main reasons is that, as weather conditions become more volatile, avalanches become more difficult to predict. For example, much of the work done by forecaster Mr. Hardesty is based on his previous observations and on computer modeling of past avalanches by scientists. But, he said, “the old hard drive won’t necessarily be accurate for watching the avalanches we’re going to see.”

He also said the avalanche threats have been magnified by the forest fires, which are made worse by the extreme heat and drought linked to climate change. “Increased layers of ash and dust in the snowpack create weak layers” which can split in avalanches, said Hardesty, and can accentuate the melting of the snowpack in general.

For Ms. Backstrom, whose brother was killed in a skiing accident, safety considerations are increasingly pressing. “Now that we have two small children, I am very demanding on my days in the backcountry because of the risk and the risk of avalanches,” she said.

She now sometimes chooses to stay on the slopes of the resort, even when the snow conditions allow her to travel the hinterland. “It’s an easy way to hike and exercise, to have that freedom and to feel the thrill of skiing back down,” she said.

As well as making ski touring less safe, climate change is also making it more difficult to traverse unmanaged terrain during an increasing part of the season as snow cover decreases.

Many North American ski resorts have spent much of this season relying almost entirely on artificial snow. “Normally there would be enough snow to at least attempt a backcountry hike now,” said Tristan Droppert, US marketing manager for Black Crows, a ski maker, in late December. “And this year, it’s still almost impossible.

In Colorado, where ski touring is particularly popular among endurance athletes, skiers have been confined to a very limited range of terrain. Copper Mountain, the training ground for the US ski team, was only 50% open in the days leading up to Christmas. The resort has quadrupled the number of uphill ski trails for cross-country skiing, but most of the trails are supplemented with artificial snow cannons. And close to Bluebird Backcountry, a ski area founded last year and dedicated exclusively to downhill skiing, there wasn’t enough snow to open by Christmas.

Between 1982 and 2016, the U.S. ski season shrank by 34 days on average, and snow levels fell by 41% on average, according to a study published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

“We are going to see a continued shortening of the snow season,” said Xubin Zeng, director of the Center for Climate Dynamics and Hydrometeorology at the University of Arizona and lead author of the study. “My best guess is that it will be at least double what we have already lost” by 2050. This trend will continue to affect not only skiing, but also agriculture, fishing and the wild ecosystems that depend on it. regular snowfall.

With that in mind, the industry is wondering whether it should adapt to the changing conditions or try to overcome them with new infrastructure and artificial snow.

China and the International Olympic Committee are preparing for the 2022 Winter Games at venues that will most likely use 100% artificial snow. About 49 million gallons of water will be needed to create the necessary conditions for the events, according to a 2019 estimate, a move that some have criticized as unsustainable.

More and more alpine skiers report using ski touring on natural snow as a reflection of their values. “Powder is one of the natural wonders of the world,” Ms. Backstrom said. “It’s just a pure miracle of nature, and you can’t reproduce it in any way, in any form.”

Clinging to these values ​​may require further adjustment as the snow cover continues to thin.

“We’re probably going to have to walk in the dirt and our boots for a while,” Droppert said of ski touring for years to come, “and then put on skis and skins.”

“But we will always ski, even if it means walking in the mud.

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Give Back NH: Jackson Ski Touring Foundation https://pwminor.com/give-back-nh-jackson-ski-touring-foundation/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 23:27:00 +0000 https://pwminor.com/give-back-nh-jackson-ski-touring-foundation/ Give Back New Hampshire is a bi-weekly segment highlighting New Hampshire nonprofits. It airs every other Saturday at 9:35 a.m. during the weekend edition. Get NHPR reports on politics, the pandemic, and other hot topics delivered to your inbox – sign up for our newsletter (it’s free!) Today. The following is a transcript from this […]]]>

Give Back New Hampshire is a bi-weekly segment highlighting New Hampshire nonprofits. It airs every other Saturday at 9:35 a.m. during the weekend edition.

Get NHPR reports on politics, the pandemic, and other hot topics delivered to your inbox – sign up for our newsletter (it’s free!) Today.

The following is a transcript from this week’s edition, which features the Jackson Ski Touring Foundation.

Ellen chandler (Executive Director): We are a 501 (c3) community hiking center with a trail system that connects the entire town of Jackson, with groomed cross-country ski trails and snowshoe trails.

Jackson Ski Touring participates with Successful project, which is an after-school program run by the three elementary schools in Conway, New Hampshire. And we send two instructors and a truck full of skis, boots and a few poles. We try to make kids ski without poles just because it teaches them better balance, and 40 kids waving poles around is … a intimidating activity.

My primary role within the organization is really to get children out on skis … from birth.

Emilie Benson

Mike Dufilho (Nordic Ski Coordinator): Yeah, I would say Jackson Ski Touring’s cross country ski program has been really great for our family.

My name is Mike Dufiho and I am the Nordic Skiing Coordinator for Jackson Grammar School in the small town of Jackson, New Hampshire.

I have three children who participate in the program. A fifth year, a third year and a first year.

Alda Dufilho (5th year): My name is Alda. I am 10 years old.

Hazel Dufilho (first grader): My name is Hazel and I am six years old. I love to cross country ski in the woods!

Alda Dufilho: I really like the cross country ski program because I can ski with friends, and I like the feeling of the wind on my face.

Emilie Benson (crew member): My primary role within the organization is really to get children out on skis … from birth.

Emily Benson helps a young student at Jackson Grammar School put on his skis, following COVID protocols.

I was a preschool teacher here in Jackson for 10 years, and we were pushing the kids right on the trails. I think it just reinforces that love for the environment, to be outside.

And being able to provide the equipment to children whose families do not necessarily do so. I think that’s what’s really, really important. The after-school programs in some of the other school districts here in our area … it just gives the kids those opportunities that wouldn’t necessarily happen.

Mike Dufilho: Living in a resort town like Jackson, where there are so many second homes and so many vacation rentals, it’s actually quite difficult to find a community, which sounds like fun considering it’s such a small town that it is a challenge. But he is.

And when our oldest Alda was in kindergarten, we still struggled to find a community – and I remember the first day they had the after-school ski program. It was like all the students at school. All the parents went out skiing together, went into the woods. It really brought home … the community.

Ellen Chandler: We invite anyone of any level of skiing and any interest in skiing to come visit our trails. We have a website, JacksonXC.org .

This will help you plan for the right day ahead because we have a ski report which is updated every day around 7:00 a.m. And then we have the information on how to take a course or participate in a program.

Alda Dufilho: I would say there is a first time for everything, and I would say you should try it because it’s fun and it’s so awesome.
______________________________________________________________

Watch this video of Mike Dufilho and his three children cross-country skiing at school!


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Manistee sees 27 inches of snow https://pwminor.com/manistee-sees-27-inches-of-snow/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 10:11:06 +0000 https://pwminor.com/manistee-sees-27-inches-of-snow/ Dan Foley joined the ranks of Venus Williams and Aretha Franklin to help the Olympic Torch find its way to Salt Lake City for the 2002 Winter Olympics. Foley, formerly of Onekama, was the first person to wear the torch in New Hampshire at the end of December. He ran his allotted two-tenth of a […]]]>

Dan Foley joined the ranks of Venus Williams and Aretha Franklin to help the Olympic Torch find its way to Salt Lake City for the 2002 Winter Olympics. Foley, formerly of Onekama, was the first person to wear the torch in New Hampshire at the end of December. He ran his allotted two-tenth of a mile leg after his torch was lit by the previous runner who had crossed the Portsmouth Bridge from Kittery, Maine.

40 YEARS AGO

Become solar

At least one family in the city has decided to switch to solar power in an attempt to cut their home’s ever-growing energy bills. The Jerry Jaloszynski family of 438 Third St. have just installed two solar systems in their home, one to heat ambient air and the other to heat domestic hot water. The systems for the house were purchased from The Other Utility Company, of Traverse City. The Company’s solar space heating systems are manufactured by Environmental Energies, Inc., located in Manistee County in Copemish.

60 YEARS AGO


Presence in the ski area

As a glut of snow, descending temperatures and poor driving conditions combined to dampen footfall at the Manistee ski area on weekends, some 448 indomitable skiers were recorded over the stormy weekend, according to the report by Les Peterson, regional director. Saturday’s total was 240 and 208 for shovel skiing on Sunday.

The Eskiloos are here


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17 Ways To Slightly Improve Your Ski Vacation In Japan Without Really Trying https://pwminor.com/17-ways-to-slightly-improve-your-ski-vacation-in-japan-without-really-trying/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 04:29:44 +0000 https://pwminor.com/17-ways-to-slightly-improve-your-ski-vacation-in-japan-without-really-trying/ Inspired by the list of 100 Ways To Slightly Improve Your Life Without Really Trying, we’ve created our own version for skiers and snowboarders traveling to Japan, but with only 17 suggestions. But we want more, and we know you have good ones. Submit your suggestion here for the chance to be featured in our […]]]>

Inspired by the list of 100 Ways To Slightly Improve Your Life Without Really Trying, we’ve created our own version for skiers and snowboarders traveling to Japan, but with only 17 suggestions.

But we want more, and we know you have good ones. Submit your suggestion here for the chance to be featured in our reader edition.

Use the Black Cat luggage service (Yamamoto Transport)

There is nothing worse than lugging heavy suitcases and ski bags around a crowded train station with family and kids, especially when everyone around you seems to be moving lightly and quickly. Japanese travelers (and discerning internationals) typically use a “Ta-Q-Bin” service to move their luggage from the airport to the hotel or from one hotel to another. Yamamoto Transport, often referred to as Black Cat or Kuro neko, is the most used and generally offers next day delivery (or even same day for some locations). Learn more here.

Ski without your phone for a day (or more)

The Guardian’s article was important for moving away from phones (eight of the 100 suggestions involve phones, or lack thereof), and we agree with the sentiment. Spend a day on the slopes without music, business calls, emails or social media and truly unplug. You will be more connected to nature, more aware of everything around you… you might even strike up an interesting conversation on the gondola.

Soothe tired muscles with a daily onsen

Slip into a very hot, mineral-rich onsen, close your eyes and feel the tension in your muscles begin to ease. If you haven’t familiarized yourself with the onsen culture of Japan, then you’re really missing out – a post-ski onsen is akin to mulled wine in France or a Jägertee in Austria. It is a must for après-ski.

Sukayu Onsen

Sukayu Onsen

Get on the first chairlift / gondola of the day

Avid skiers and snowboarders pay hundreds and thousands of dollars to ski cat or heli-ski, with the goal of skiing in fresh powder and getting the first runs. You can do the same for the price of a lift ticket and a little patience. It’s worth it in every way, and it’s really not that difficult.

Try curry soup in Hokkaido: the ultimate winter dish

A controversial dish, perhaps, but we think Hokkaido curry soup is the quintessential winter dish – a warming and often spicy soup-like curry mixed with a variety of meat and vegetables (the recipe may change depending on location). If you’re skiing in Japan’s northernmost province or, better yet, passing through Sapporo (the home of the dish), be sure to stop for some curry soup and a cold beer. It will make your life better!

Suage Curry Soup

Suage curry soup, one of the best in Sapporo

Buy your ski boots with an expert shoemaker

There is nothing that ruins a ski vacation like ill-fitting boots, and the best thing you can do to take most of the risk out of the equation is to have a boot installer assess you and your feet. put on a suitable pair of shoes. The tricky part is actually finding a good person. We have revealed some secrets of dark art in this article.

Try a new one konbini snack every day

from Japan konbinis (mini markets) are a culinary gold mine, and it’s worth being a little adventurous. Avoid the temptation to pick the same thing every day and instead eat variety, the spice of life.

Konbini food

The humble konbini, a culinary gold mine

Take a lesson, even if you are a good skier / snowboarder

Beginners will gain tremendously by taking a lesson with a pro, but we challenge intermediate and advanced skiers to sign up for a private lesson or lesson. You are never good enough at improving your skiing, and you will likely learn more about the resort than you would on your own.

Kiroro ski school

A Kiroro ski instructor assists a beginner skier on the Family course.

Buy a cold Asahi from your ski instructor

And that brings us to our next point: buy a beer or a coffee for your instructor. Instructors are often a source of local knowledge, and the small gesture is usually greatly appreciated and can yield local tips and advice. Ask them where they go first on a powder day (at least worth the price of a beer…).

Book your room with a traditional futon / tatami configuration

There is something about sleeping on a futon on a tatami mat floor that is totally rejuvenating, especially after a long day on the hill. We’re not sure if it’s the tired muscles or the onsen before it, but we’ve had some of our best sleeps on this traditional Japanese setup. At the very least, it’s a quintessential Japanese experience that you won’t get anywhere else.

Tatami futon

The key to a good night’s sleep?

Take a day to get away from it all on a small local hill

There are over 500 ski resorts in Japan – over 100 in Hokkaido alone – and many are smaller resorts with just a few ski lifts and a single restaurant / resort. Often times you’ll find these pint-sized resorts around the corner of the larger ones (Kutchan’s Asahigaoka Ski Resort near Niseko United, for example). These places are often the heart and soul of the local ski community, with very low prices to boot. Take a day or even an afternoon, you won’t be disappointed.

Mogul skiing (especially in spring)

Japan is rightly known for powder skiing, but anyone who’s spent an entire season in the snow will tell you that spring (or even earlier) is for mogul skiing. Japanese skiers tend to love moguls, and in addition to the naturally formed mogul fields you will often find a single row on the side of groomed slopes which can be a lot of fun. Try it if you are up to it! Or take a lesson (see above).

Warm up with a hot drink from a vending machine

Japan’s vending machines are famous, and at ski resorts they are becoming a popular spot for anyone looking for a quick way to warm up their body. The choice of drink can be vast and very personal! A can of hot coffee? Soup Corn? Milk tea? Hot lemon? Yes please…

Hot drinks dispenser

Hot corn soup anyone?

Ski touring

Ok, so this one doesn’t necessarily fit into the ‘without really trying’ category – you’re definitely going to sweat – but if there’s a place to try ski touring for the first time, we think it’s the one. Japan. Many large skis are practiced below the treeline and as a general rule the avalanche danger tends to be lower than in Europe or the United States (note: the dangers are always present and you will need to ‘an experienced and qualified guide if you are new to the backcountry). Plus, cool slopes in Japan’s famous powder snow are almost a guarantee.

Hike in the hinterland near Tomamu

Hike in the hinterland near Tomamu

Reserve your place on the shinkansen

Anyone who has spent any time standing on a crowded shinkansen during peak season will tell you this is a no-brainer. Spend that little extra on reserved seats… trust us.

Take a pair of ice cream tongs

In case you haven’t heard, there is a lot of snow in Japan and the streets can be as dangerous as the ski slopes on occasion. Unless you have a super sturdy pair of snow boots, avoid a trip to the emergency room and get a pair of inexpensive ice grips to clip to the soles of your shoes.

Try a limited edition beer / a kit kat / an ice cream

Japan is the undisputed land of limited editions of food and drink, whether it’s ice cream, beer, or kat kits. So, again, head to the konbini and treat yourself to a snack or drink that you won’t get anywhere else in the world, and probably never in Japan again.

Yebisu winter edition beer

We are big fans of the Yebisu seasonal beer releases

Think you have a better suggestion? Submit it here for the chance to be featured in our reader edition.

REVEAL

LinenWin a Flaxta Deep Space ski helmet with MIPS technology

We’ve teamed up with the innovative Swedish team at Flaxta who recently released the Deep Space helmet, an ideal all-terrain helmet with award-winning safety and comfort.

ENTER


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Pagosa Nordic Club ski clinics start January 9 https://pwminor.com/pagosa-nordic-club-ski-clinics-start-january-9/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 14:31:03 +0000 https://pwminor.com/pagosa-nordic-club-ski-clinics-start-january-9/ The Pagosa Nordic Club offers introductory Nordic skiing courses – for classic and skate styles – which take place throughout the season. The basics of skate skiing and classic cross-country skiing will be shared by some of the best skiers in Pagosa Springs. All clinics are free. Donations and membership in the Pagosa Nordic Club […]]]>

The Pagosa Nordic Club offers introductory Nordic skiing courses – for classic and skate styles – which take place throughout the season. The basics of skate skiing and classic cross-country skiing will be shared by some of the best skiers in Pagosa Springs. All clinics are free. Donations and membership in the Pagosa Nordic Club are strongly encouraged to help offset expenses related to running clinics and maintaining trails.

These are great clinics for the never-ever, newbie, and intermediate. Learn how to make these outdoor winter activities even more enjoyable. Bring your ski equipment: skating skis or classic kick and glide.

Local ski shops offer discounted rentals for clinics, just mention that you are attending the clinic and ask for the discount. Pagosa Mountain Sports, Pagosa Ski Rentals, Summit Sports, Alpen Haus Ski Center and Ski & Bow Rack rent classic skis, with Alpen Haus and Ski & Bow Rack also renting skate-ski equipment. Make sure to ask for the discount.

Due to Covid-19, Learn to Ski clinics will have limited capacity. Pre-registration is required WITHOUT WALK-UPS. Face coverings are mandatory for all people who attend clinics. You will need to download and print the waiver, complete it, and bring it with you to the clinic.

Sunday January 9
Checked in and ready to ski at 9.45am with a lesson starting at 10am at Cloman Park. (Keep checking on site due to snow conditions, it may need to be moved.)

Saturday 22 January as part of the Pagosa Winterfest
Checked in and ready to ski at 9.45am with lesson starting at 10am at Cloman Park (Continue to check on site due to snow conditions, may need to be moved.)

saturday 5 february
Checked in and ready to ski at 9.45am with a lesson starting at 10am at Cloman Park. (Keep checking on site due to snow conditions, it may need to be moved.)

Please plan to arrive early, prepare and check in by 9.45am with a lesson starting at 10am; late arrivals disrupt lessons. The parking lot is often crowded. Allow time to park and walk to the staging area for check-in. Classes last approximately 1 hour and a half.

You will need to bring skis, boots, poles, dress warmly and arrive early enough to be equipped and ready at 9.45am… with a lesson starting at 10am.

Space is limited for each style / level and date of class! No walk will be excluded. If you cannot make your reservation, please notify pagosanordic@gmail.com at least 48 hours in advance to allow waiting list participants to attend for you.

To register for one of these clinics and print the disclaimer, visit The Pagosa Nordic Club website, here.

Contributor position

The Pagosa Daily Post accepts submissions, photos, letters, and videos from people who love Pagosa Springs, Colorado. Call 970-903-2673 or email pagosadailypost@gmail.com


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Kilde looking for another Olympic gold in Norwegian skiing https://pwminor.com/kilde-looking-for-another-olympic-gold-in-norwegian-skiing/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 03:08:10 +0000 https://pwminor.com/kilde-looking-for-another-olympic-gold-in-norwegian-skiing/ Published on: 01/02/2022 – 04:08Amended: 01/02/2022 – 04:06 Paris (AFP) – Aleksander Aamodt Kilde has a huge task to follow on the ski slopes of an illustrious trio of fellow Norwegians, but he hopes to emulate their Olympic success in Beijing in February. The 29-year-old is half of the golden couple in alpine skiing with […]]]>

Published on: Amended:

Paris (AFP) – Aleksander Aamodt Kilde has a huge task to follow on the ski slopes of an illustrious trio of fellow Norwegians, but he hopes to emulate their Olympic success in Beijing in February.

The 29-year-old is half of the golden couple in alpine skiing with his girlfriend, American star Mikaela Shiffrin.

While Shiffrin has two Olympic titles under his belt, Kilde has an empty medal closet, although with three successive super-G wins on the World Cup circuit this season he is in perfect form to address it. .

If he needs motivation, he doesn’t need to look any further than now retired Kjetil Andre Aamodt who dominated the Olympics, winning the event three times in 1992, 2002 and 2006. .

Kilde’s form – he also has a downhill victory this season – is all the more honorable given that he tore his cruciate ligaments in his right knee last January.

The 2020 World Cup overall champion is relaxing in Innsbruck ahead of the season’s resumption and has had time to consider whether his third Olympics would be really lucky for him.

“These are big shoes to fill in though,” he told AFP in a telephone interview, referring to Aamodt, 2010 Olympic super-G champion Aksel Lund Svindal and Kjetil Jansrud, who won the event at the Sochi 2014 Games.

“When you mention these names, it’s crazy to think of it.

“It’s amazing how they managed to do that.

“Of course I want to try and keep it Norwegian, but it’s easier said than done.”

“Not on the same page”

Kilde also competed in the 2018 downhill in PyeongChang, won by Svindal with Jansrud winning the silver medal, but despite finishing 15th he said it remains the most inspiring sporting moment for him due to his country’s success. .

“Aksel and Kjetil being one and two … it was a bit unexpected as the preparation for this race did not go well,” said Kilde.

“The video and the analysis of everything was kind of a question. But they found their rhythm.

“I remember it was such an amazing day for the team.”

Kilde says he will avoid challenging Shiffrin to an Olympic medal competition in Beijing – and not just because it might tempt fate.

“I’m smart enough to say I don’t think I want to compete with her when it comes to performance!” he laughs.

“If you look at his stats, I’m not on the same page.”

However, Kilde – who is three years older than Shiffrin – said he had learned from the American’s Olympic success.

“Yes, we are talking about it,” he said.

“These Olympics will be different for sure.

“But we try to see it as a new experience, to stay positive and give ourselves a little bit of confidence.”

Kilde says the injury has forced him to change his post-race routine as his knee is sore and he cannot indulge in such a difficult routine as before.

“I don’t think it will be like that for the rest of my career, but for this season at least it will be different.”

Kilde says the four wins were “unbelievable” and he never expected to come back with such a bang, which gave him the much-needed confidence ahead of the Games.

Aleksander Aamodt Kilde is one of the golden couple in skiing with Mikaela Shiffrin Fabrice COFFRINI AFP

“I want to keep that confidence throughout the Olympics and the season,” he said.

“Trying to focus on the right things.

“It’s going to be an Olympics where things are new for everyone, no one has tried the slope.”


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Tiffany Trump Goes Icy in Puffer Coat & Combat Boots with Marla Maples – Footwear News https://pwminor.com/tiffany-trump-goes-icy-in-puffer-coat-combat-boots-with-marla-maples-footwear-news/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 21:59:13 +0000 https://pwminor.com/tiffany-trump-goes-icy-in-puffer-coat-combat-boots-with-marla-maples-footwear-news/ All products and services presented are independently selected by the editors. However, FN may receive a commission on orders placed through its retail links, and the retailer may receive certain verifiable data for accounting purposes. Tiffany Trump brought ski style an edge while celebrating the holidays with her mom, Marla Maples. For the occasion, Trump […]]]>

All products and services presented are independently selected by the editors. However, FN may receive a commission on orders placed through its retail links, and the retailer may receive certain verifiable data for accounting purposes.

Tiffany Trump brought ski style an edge while celebrating the holidays with her mom, Marla Maples.

For the occasion, Trump wore black leggings with a black top, layered under a pale blue puffer jacket. Her outerwear included a fur hood, as well as a zippered front pocket. The Georgetown University graduate’s look featured no accessories other than her diamond engagement ring. Maples took a similar styling route, pairing slim black jeans with a metallic puffer jacket with a sheepskin-lined hood. Her outfit also included black pointed toe boots with silver accents.

“It’s time for all of us… to reach higher than we can imagine to bring the most light and joy to our world! We all have a choice. Each of us are created with starlight and purpose and together we shine even brighter, ”Maples said in the caption of her post. “# 2022 we are ready !!”

Trump’s shoes of choice were a pair of black combat boots. Its lace-up style featured leather uppers with rounded toes, along with chunky textured front straps and ridged soles. The pair gave it a grunge look, as well as being practical while providing fuller coverage for the winter.

Combat boots are a major shoe trend in the fall and winter, due to their fuller coverage and ability to create a utilitarian ensemble from their traditional laces and chunky soles. Many brands, including Louis Vuitton, Bottega Veneta, and Gucci, have taken the style a step further by introducing pairs with spiked soles, a chunkier version of the ridged soles of combat boots. In addition to Trump, stars like Elsa Hosk, Kourtney Kardashian and Kelly Clarkson have worn equally daring combat boots from Christian Louboutin, Chanel and Prada in recent weeks.

When it comes to shoes, the former first girl prefers point-toe pumps as a go-to style, which she has worn for years in shades of black, beige and ivory from brands like Valentino. For events or the red carpet, she regularly dons strappy sandals and platform boots from brands like Louboutin. When not on duty, Trump keeps his shoes decidedly more comfortable, appearing in moccasins or preppy flats.

Add combat boots to your winter wardrobe.


CREDIT: Courtesy of Nordstrom

To buy: Sam Edelman Lydell Boots, $ 95 (was $ 180).


Michael Michael Kors, combat boots, black boots, lace up boots, leather boots

CREDIT: Courtesy of Saks Fifth Avenue

To buy: Michael Michael Kors Bryce Boots, $ 225.


Target, A New Day, combat boots, black boots, lace up boots, leather boots

CREDIT: Courtesy of Target

To buy: A New Day Brie Boots, $ 40.

Click through the gallery to see the evolution of Tiffany Trump’s style over the years.



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Kristin Cavallari and her kids take a scenic trip to her hometown of Colorado https://pwminor.com/kristin-cavallari-and-her-kids-take-a-scenic-trip-to-her-hometown-of-colorado/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 04:01:00 +0000 https://pwminor.com/kristin-cavallari-and-her-kids-take-a-scenic-trip-to-her-hometown-of-colorado/ Kristin Cavallari bundles up to ski with her kids on a scenic trip to her home state of Colorado By Mark Mcgreal For Dailymail.Com Posted: 04:01 GMT, December 30, 2021 | Update: 04:01 GMT, December 30, 2021 Kristin Cavallari bundled up to go skiing with her kids on a visit to her home state of […]]]>

Kristin Cavallari bundles up to ski with her kids on a scenic trip to her home state of Colorado










Kristin Cavallari bundled up to go skiing with her kids on a visit to her home state of Colorado this week.

She enthusiastically shared snaps from her family’s winter vacation, which also included her father Dennis Cavallari, with her 4.2 million followers on Wednesday afternoon.

“Born a CO girl,” captioned the 34-year-old reality TV star, who was notably born in the city of Denver in 1987.

Vacation fun: Kristin Cavallari excitedly shared snaps from her family’s winter vacation, which also included her dad Dennis Cavallari, with her 4.2 million followers

The star shared a photo that showed her three children standing in a snowy landscape on skis. Huge snow-capped pines dotted the mountains behind them.

Later in the trip, she shared a photo in which she wore a long pink sweater with white pants and large brown boots.

Another showed her, her children and her father dressed ready to go skiing.

“Skiing with Grandpa,” the Hills star wrote in the caption of the photo.

“Skiing with grandfather”: Cavallari’s last post, which she shared on Wednesday, showed her, her children and her father dressed ready to go skiing

Standing in a winter wonderland: The star shared a photo that showed her three children standing in a snowy landscape while standing on skis

Standing in a winter wonderland: The star shared a photo that showed her three children standing in a snowy landscape while standing on skis

Cavallari certainly seemed to be enjoying the weekend with his three children: Camden, 9, Jaxon, 7, and Saylor, 6.

She shares her three children with former Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler who she was married to from 2013 to 2020.

The two had their first date in 2010 and got engaged in 2011. They ended their romance in 2020 with Cavallari citing “irreconcilable marital conduct” and “irreconcilable differences”.

Sharing their children: Cavallari certainly appeared to be enjoying the weekend with her three children whom she shares with Jay Cutler (pictured 2013)

Sharing their children: Cavallari certainly appeared to be enjoying the weekend with her three children whom she shares with Jay Cutler (pictured 2013)

Breakup: Cutler and Cavallari were married from 2013-2020 although they divorced Cavallari citing a

Breakup: Cutler and Cavallari were married from 2013 to 2020 despite divorcing Cavallari citing “irreconcilable marital conduct” and “irreconcilable differences” (pictured 2019)

Cavallari has had some relationships since his divorce, most notably with comedian Jeff Dye and, more recently, with country music singer Chase Rice, although there is “no official label,” a source said. Us weekly back in October.

He is on tour now and she has no plans to visit him, ”the insider said. “She’s too busy with her business and her kids.

Cutler also dated a few people, including actress Jana Kramer, but their relationship ended as well.

Back in the dating pool: Cavallari has had a few relationships since her divorce, most notably with Jeff Dye and, most recently, Chase Rice

Back in the dating pool: Cavallari has had a few relationships since her divorce, most notably with Jeff Dye and, most recently, Chase Rice


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W.Va. State Parks hosts guided hikes January 1 in eight parks https://pwminor.com/w-va-state-parks-hosts-guided-hikes-january-1-in-eight-parks/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 00:25:58 +0000 https://pwminor.com/w-va-state-parks-hosts-guided-hikes-january-1-in-eight-parks/ Blackwater Falls in winter Guided hikes are scheduled for Jan. 1, 2022 at eight West Virginia state parks, in conjunction with the national First Day Hikes program. The hikes vary in length and difficulty, although most range from one to three miles and are suitable for all ages. Advertising the Day one hikes are free […]]]>

Blackwater Falls in winter

Guided hikes are scheduled for Jan. 1, 2022 at eight West Virginia state parks, in conjunction with the national First Day Hikes program. The hikes vary in length and difficulty, although most range from one to three miles and are suitable for all ages.

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the Day one hikes are free and designed to showcase the natural beauty of the parks, and guides will provide participants with information on local history, wildlife, and points of interest. Hikes are planned in the following parks.

Hikers should dress in layers to prepare for winter temperatures. Even on the hottest winter days, park officials advise hikers to wear a coat, gloves and hat.

Sturdy boots or shoes are essential to stay comfortable on the track. Hikers can also bring water and snacks for longer walks.


Cold weather hike

The American Hiking Society, a promoter of the national First Day Hikes initiative, offers the following tips for hiking in cold weather:

Dress in layers. While it might be nice to have a huge, fluffy parka on the ski slopes, it really isn’t practical for the slope. Instead, grab several layers that you can peel off or put on when you stop and go out on the trail. Your base layer should be an absorbent fabric that will pull your sweat away from the skin. Overheating is a dangerous threat because excessive moisture that cannot escape can freeze and cause hypothermia. If you’ve ever wondered why some of your jackets have armpit zippers, it’s to circulate air and keep your clothes from getting wet.

Wear a hat! Our heads are filled with oxygen-carrying capillaries that fuel our brains and consume a third of the body’s energy. During the colder months, it is important to keep your head covered to maintain function and not to lose precious body heat. You may want to bring a warmer / heavier hat for downtime.

Keep your water bottle warm. Whether you’re at the campsite or on the trail, a foam sleeve like a koozie will help keep water from freezing in a bottle. Nothing warms your body or mind like hot liquid near a campfire. Boil some water to take with you on your hike. Plus, to keep the water from freezing, keep your water bottle inside your jacket – tightly sealed, of course.

Use a sleeping bag liner. You don’t need to pack yourself up with a heavier sleeping bag for winter camping. Putting a liner in a 20 degree bag is an inexpensive way to increase your bag rating to about 10 more degrees.

Do not throw away sunscreen. While this is very important if you are hiking in a snowy area, winter hikers often overlook the reflections of the sun reflecting off the white snow.

Be prepared for shorter days. From October, twilight sets in earlier and faster than in summer. Get a good idea of ​​the usable daylight hours before you hike. Always carry a headlamp or flashlight with extra batteries.

In addition to these tips and tricks, remember to follow normal safety practices also when hiking in winter. Make sure you have the equipment you take with you and if you have specific questions ask a local outdoor expert so you can stay safe.


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Father and daughter compete in 26.2-mile Antarctic Ice Marathon – American Press https://pwminor.com/father-and-daughter-compete-in-26-2-mile-antarctic-ice-marathon-american-press/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 17:27:38 +0000 https://pwminor.com/father-and-daughter-compete-in-26-2-mile-antarctic-ice-marathon-american-press/ The daughter of local father John Hixson and Lauren Phillips recently completed the Antarctic Ice Marathon. Hand in hand, the two reached the finish line of the 26.2 mile race through Union Glacier, Phillip’s first marathon and the completion of the ‘Marathon on Every Continent’ goal of Hixson. “It was a fun experience. Originally, 12 […]]]>

The daughter of local father John Hixson and Lauren Phillips recently completed the Antarctic Ice Marathon. Hand in hand, the two reached the finish line of the 26.2 mile race through Union Glacier, Phillip’s first marathon and the completion of the ‘Marathon on Every Continent’ goal of Hixson.

“It was a fun experience. Originally, 12 years ago, my goal was to run a marathon on every continent and I did it! Antarctica was my last… Running in Antarctica was really fun and exciting, but doing it with her (Phillips) was the real joy, ”said Hixson.

Hixson has now completed over 20 marathons. The 60-year-old started running long distances at the age of 40.

“A friend of mine said to me, ‘Do you have any hobbies?’ And I was like, ‘I don’t have one. It’s terrible. I work too much. ‘ So I said, ‘Well, I want to run a half marathon.’ And I did. And then, ‘I want to do a full marathon.’ I took the training and heard about the Seven Continents Club, a group of less than 400 people who have done this around the world.

Hixson got his daughters to run with the alluring idea of ​​traveling the world to do so. “He said, ‘If I did, he would take me to these cool places,” ”said Phillips. “I was like fine, I love ice creams and cakes so it’s a great excuse to eat more!” It’s great because we were traveling as a family and then we were running as a family.

Antarctica was Phillips’ fourth continent to run on and his first full marathon. “He’s finishing his trip and I’m just getting started. Now he’s getting to come, ”she said.

Training for Antarctica has some similarities to training for other marathons, the two said, with a few exceptions. “Once a week you have a longer run than anything else. It starts at nine, 12, 15, 18 miles… You build gradually, ”Hixson said.

“But with that, they recommend you do it slower because the race took a lot longer. You’re running on Union Glacier, which is about a mile and a half thick of glacial ice and hundreds of miles wide and there’s snow at the top. It’s like running on loose sand.

Hixson and Phillips finished in just under seven hours, “probably two to three hours longer than it would take for a normal marathon,” he said.

But fast weather isn’t the goal or culture of the Antarctic Ice Marathon, Phillips said. “That’s the one thing we all promised ourselves: that we’re not going to ask how long it took. So each of us would walk around saying, “You’re done! ”

“Your goal was to finish because in 20 years, people are going to be asking, ‘Did you run in Antarctica? “They’re not going to ask for our time, hopefully,” she said.

The elements of Antarctica make the race both a unique challenge and an unforgettable experience. At a “hot” temperature of seven degrees, the two ran in mostly layered ski clothes that had to be put on and taken off throughout the trip, took off the frozen boots when it was all over, ran at 5 p.m. at 2:30 in the morning and taken in the vast calm of the white landscape devoid of plant or animal life.

“Let’s say you went into the woods here in southwest Louisiana. You might not hear any cars or people or anything, but you will hear the wind blowing in the trees, animals and stuff like that. You didn’t hear a thing… It’s literally breathtaking silence as you gaze out across a landscape of white. It is truly breathtaking and incredible and unlike anything I have ever seen or experienced, ”Hixson said.

Sixty participants from 21 countries completed the marathon, another unexpected joy of the trip, Phillips said. “All regions of the world, all types of languages ​​and we all have one thing in common. It was fun to have that experience of bonding with strangers and you are able to come together and achieve a goal.

With Hixson “moving on” to the next phase of his athletic journey and Phillips planning his next races, the two smiled at each other, genuinely happy to have shared their experiences together. “It’s a real joy and especially to be in fairly good physical shape at my age,” said Hixson.

“I’m going to try to do the New York and Tokyo, Japan marathon. All my travels are going to revolve around this. But I’m going to be coaching my dad and my family this time around, ”Phillips said.


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