Jigsaw fashion chain bans advertising to “objectify” women

An advertisement for the fashion chain Jigsaw which showed a model climbing a fence in underwear was banned because it could commit a serious offense by objectifying women.

An email from the clothing retailer in September stated in the subject line: “These boots were made for walking,” and included a photo of a woman climbing a fence wearing a sweater, boots and only underpants over her. lower half.

Two readers complained that the ad objectified women and was offensive and irresponsible.

We considered that the advertisement objectified the model represented and invited readers to consider her body as a sexual object.

Advertising Standards Authority

Robinson Webster, trading as Jigsaw, said the image was created by an all-female team and “came from a place of celebration and freedom.”

Jigsaw said the model was wearing a swimsuit and no other body part was exposed as the image focused on the boots she was wearing.

Jigsaw said they understood that seeing the image in isolation and without the larger context could have made it perceived in a different way, which was not their intention. They have agreed to remove the image from any future advertisements.



Undated document image issued by the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) of a


© Provided by Evening Standard
Undated document image issued by the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) of a

the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) said: “The model’s face was not visible and, since it focuses on the model’s exposed buttocks and upper legs, we considered the low-angle nature of the model. image gave him a feeling of voyeurism.

“We considered that there was therefore a sexually suggestive element in the image. We considered her partial nudity to be in more prominence as she appeared to be hiking or walking in the woods, where people wouldn’t normally be stripped that way.

“For these reasons, we considered that the advertisement objectified the model represented and invited readers to consider her body as a sexual object. Therefore, because the advertisement objectified and stereotyped women as sexual objects, we concluded that it was irresponsible and likely to cause serious offense. “

The ASA ruled that the ad should no longer appear in its current form, adding, “We told Jigsaw to ensure that future publicity does not cause serious offense by objectifying women.”

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